Tanzania

With Publication Comes Responsibility: Using open data for accountability in Benin and Tanzania – A discussion paper

What is being spent, in which sector and where? What did development cooperation activities set out to do and what did they achieve? These are the sort of questions that are asked of people and organisations engaged in aid and development work. Historically, a lack of transparency in the development sector made it difficult to answer these questions. In the last decade, however, things have started to change. International donors and national actors have begun publishing open data that is unprecedented in its detail and scope. However, to date there are only anecdotal examples of the way this data can be and is being used for accountability and little evidence that it has made a difference to development outcomes.
This paper combines primary research from Benin and Tanzania with secondary research on the use of open data for accountability to explore what happens at country-level once it is published: who is interested in using it, how and what for? If the data is not being used, what are the obstacles and how can they be overcome?

Download With-Publication-Brings-Responsibility-A-discussion-paper-1 – published by Publish What You Fund


A brief presentation on experience drawn from social accountability monitoring exercise in the Iringa District Council, Tanzania

One of the government’s obligatory responsibilities is to provide quality socio-economic services to it’s people – the citizens. Other responsibilities include that of ensuring peace and order is maintained among its people in the country. Due to the magnitude of the government’s roles, with limited financial resources, there are NGOs like TACOSODE which assist the government in fulfilling its obligation of providing social services to the people. TACOSODE has also equipped people in its project areas to perform social accountability monitoring especially in health services provision. The basis on which people undertake social accountability monitoring is their participation in identification, planning, monitoring and evaluation of the services provided. This participation makes them understand health requirements and therefore what, and how much, services they need. Unfortunately, this project is only implemented in 5 wards and in 10 villages. This presentation examines and compares situations in TACOSODE served villages and those villages that are not served by TACOSODE in the Iringa District Council.

You can download the full presentation made by Tacosode at the PSA annual workshop held in January in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.


Appetite for accountability in Tanzania: Translating election-time signals into accountability values

Article orignally posted here

In most countries with multi-party systems an election year presents (at least the possibility) of new opportunities and excitement: will the balance of power shift? Will newcomers and new ideas, at the sub-national and national levels, come to the center stage? Prior to the general elections in Tanzania in 2015, popular opinion among certain groups suggested that this might be the election when opposition parties could gain control of the executive. And although the ruling party (CCM), which has been in power since independence, maintained its grip on power, it was, by many accounts, the closest election in Tanzanian multi-party history.

Twaweza partnered with the Governance Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to ask how do ordinary Tanzanian citizens see politics and government?

For full results as well as comparison between the regions studied, and a discussion on what the results might mean, please read the attached brief.